Can Dogs Eat Butternut Squash? Is It Safe?

When squash season comes around, it seems like we’ll never run out of it. Winter squashes stack up in grocery aisles and decorate our fall tables. We can’t get enough butternut squash soup or roasted squash on our dinner plates.

If we are enjoying a certain food, of course, our pup shows an interest in it. Can dogs eat butternut squash? The answer is an overwhelming, “Yes!”

Butternut Squash For Dogs

Pet owners and vets alike champion feeding butternut squash to dogs. These winter squashes are full of nutrients and are healing to an upset digestive system. Butternut squash is a great once in a while treat for your dog, if you know what is good and what to avoid.

Is Butternut Squash Healthy For My dog?

Butternut squash is a sweet, nutty-tasting multivitamin for humans and dogs containing:

  • Vitamin A for long-lasting vision,
  • Vitamin C to boost the immune system,
  • Disease fighting beta-carotene,
  • All sorts of phytonutrients for healthy cell function,
  • Potassium for strong bones.

Butternut is lower in carbohydrates than a sweet potato, another popular dog treat.

Can Dogs Eat Butternut squash?

The ASPCA says (that’s the American Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals,) that butternut squash is non-toxic to dogs.

Butternut squash is safe for dogs. You must take the same precautions you take with anything you give your pup. Be sure it is clean and prepared in a simple recipe. Be sure to choose organic and additive-free if you buy canned. Look for glass jars or cans free of BPS plastic, which can be harmful to your dog.

Squash seeds will upset your dog’s stomach, but there are lots of nutrients in the skin. When cooked until tender, it’s just fine for your dog to eat..

If Your Dog Feels Bad…

Sometimes, no matter how careful we are, our dog gets sick.  Something is going to cause gas, bloating or worse, intestinal problems with your pup. Breeders and veterinarians will recommend plain boiled butternut squash for stomach upset. The fiber in butternut squash helps to end a bout of diarrhea.

How To Feed Your Dog Butternut Squash?

It can seem a little intimidating to cut up the very hard skin and flesh of a butternut squash. Use a sharp knife and protect your hands. Try putting the whole squash in a microwave for a few minutes to soften the skin and make your job easier.

You don’t have to cube butternut squash while it is still raw. Just cut it into chunks that will fit in whatever pan you are using. Save the detail work for when the squash is cooked soft! Be sure, though, to get rid of the seeds before you cook it. Try butternut squash in these ways:

  • Boil the larger chunks in water until a fork easily pierces the flesh. Drain it, let it cool until you can cut it into cubes.
  • Roast the chunks in a 400 degree oven until you can poke it the same with a fork. Let it cool before you try to handle it.
  • Once cooked, you can scrape the flesh from the skin and mash it to add to regular dog food.
  • You can cube the squash to use as a treat. Be extra sure the squash is cooled and won’t burn your dog’s mouth.
  • You could always make this soup recipe just for doggies. It should be fun to try.

Watch Out For These Dangers When You Give Your Dog Squash

When you offer your dog any treat, remember to remove those same calories from another meal. Even quick, tasty bites of butternut squash will add up. Extra calories are always a health concern.

Dogs don’t need the extra seasonings that humans add to foods. Your pup might develop a taste for salt, butter, onions or garlic, but don’t give in to begging. These things can cause stomach upset or disease.

Watch your dog for signs of allergies when you offer any new food. Extra (more than usual,) scratching, sneezing, or runny eyes are a sign that something is wrong. Your dog should stop eating the new food. Call your veterinarian for advice.

You CAN feed your dog butternut squash. It is safe to give your dog, so try it out today.

Enjoy!

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